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Week 6: (Thu) ISS and RS Signed-off-by: Tj Hariharan <Tj@archlinux.us>

new file: notes/iss131r/Lec_Jun07.pdf
new file: notes/iss131r/Lec_Jun07.tex
new file: notes/rs205/Lec_Jun07.pdf
new file: notes/rs205/Lec_Jun07.tex

Tj Hariharan authored on 10/Jun/2012 09:12
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+\documentclass[letterpaper,12pt,english]{article} %report for homework
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+
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+\usepackage{babel}
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+\usepackage{times}
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+\usepackage{pifont}
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+\usepackage{moreverb}
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+\usepackage{alltt}
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+\usepackage[pdfauthor={Tejas (Tj) Hariharan}]{hyperref}
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+
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+
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+\begin{document}
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+\renewcommand{\subitem}{\item[\ding{229}]}
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+\renewcommand{\it}{\item[\ding{225}]}
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+
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+\title{Lecture: \today }\author{Tejas (Tj) Hariharan 
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+\footnote{Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share 
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+Alike 3.0 License. c.f. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/ for full license}} 
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+\maketitle
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+
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+\section{For Today's Class}
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+\begin{itemize}
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+  \it Midterm: Two sections.  
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+  \subitem First Section = \textbf{Concepts (pull 6 of 12 and write 4 of 6).} 1 page answer (double spaced). Pairs of 
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+  terms given, define the two, and then compare/contrast the two. The 
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+  compare/contrast should be about 2 paragraphs long, not too much on 
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+  definition. (Worth 40percent of the exam).
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+  \subitem Second = \textbf{Essay Question (pull 3 of six, and write 2 of 3)}. Make sure 
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+  to answer all the questions given, as given (if all done properly, that's a 
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+  B answer). Over and above that, answer should show the depth of knowledge 
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+  and presence in the course, discussions etc. It is okay to just answer all 
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+  the questions first, without bothering about proper essay structure etc.  
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+\end{itemize}
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+
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+\section{Fascism}
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+\begin{itemize}
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+  \it Eugenics: Canadians had the eugenics programme the longest among any 
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+  developed country. 
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+  \subitem Role of eugenics in the idea of the Aryan race and hitler's ideas 
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+  of it etc.  
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+  \it \textbf{Fascism: }Radical, Authoritarian, Nationalist ideology.  
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+  \subitem Fascists argue that the state is an organic, united community that 
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+  requires strong and total leadership and needs singular, collective identity.  
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+  \subitem This is the first group we have studied that talks about War in a 
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+  positive manner, the fascists say that War plays a role in building and 
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+  keeping national spirit and vitality. Military should rule, and the leader 
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+  should be chose from the military via merit.  
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+  \subitem Nationalism is very important to Fascism, and a UNITED nationalism, 
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+  they would be against multi-cultural ism etc. 
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+  \it Fascists root themselves in maintaining tradition, in that way they are 
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+  similar to conservatism.  
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+  \subitem Once they are in power, social change is a big no-no, while the 
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+  rise to power is very bloody, and full of revolution.  
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+  \it Economically, they are seen as a third option, a hybrid system where corporates exist 
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+  and work with labour but work are controlled by the state. A midway between 
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+  capitalism and Marxism. 
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+  \it Rooted in national, political and economic autonomy. Fascists seek to be 
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+  completely independent and autonomous in economic and national decisions. 
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+  They want to close the borders, economic independence is paramount to being 
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+  fully autonomous.   
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+  \it They usually have a movement and a mass mobilisation of the youth (indoctrination through the youth).
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+  \it While Marx talked about the influence of the socio-economy on the 
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+  institutions, fascists on the other hand USE these institutions to make 
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+  changes to the socio-economic structures
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+  \it Fascism is on the rise today, due to the emerging global economic 
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+  issues, and the rise of globalisation and multi-culturalism
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+  etc, also in the developed countries (usually anti-immigration).  
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+  \subitem This works very well, due to the charismatic leader.  
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+\end{itemize}
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+
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+\section{Mussolini}
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+\begin{itemize}
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+  \it Both him and Hitler were raised as socialists, and earlier were 
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+  socialists, but rejected it due to Marxists ideas of equality, that was part 
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+  of the socialist movement.  
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+  \subitem Shifts thinking from Class Conflict thinking, to National Conflict 
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+  thinking. War can solidify National identity.  
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+  \it Both him and Hitler rose to power in a very similar fashion (did the 
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+  same things).
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+  \subitem Started off, creating public works, combated economic recessions 
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+  etc. These are services that were built to give the young unemployed people 
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+  jobs; the idea is to MAKE the country self-sufficient. 
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+  \subitem This also showed him as a nice person, who is all for `nation 
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+  building' etc.  
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+  \it He asked everyone to give up their gold, so as to get out of the 
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+  economic slump, TOGETHER, this is all tied to the idea of ``nation building''.
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+  \it Most important thing here, to remember as a reason to a lot of what was 
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+  done early on (see slide) is the idea of nation building, national pride and 
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+  trying to keep everything autonomous as a nation and within the country. 
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+  \it Autarky: Self Sufficient, independent country. 
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+  \it Mussolini was less concerned about race, and was actively pursuing 
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+  colonisation, anyone could be Italian (Nation vs State, nation=one culture, 
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+  one tradition, state is more multi-cultural). Hitler wanted to build the 
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+  nation of Germany, while Mussolini wanted to expand the state.  
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+  \subitem Hitler and Mussolini had a fall out due to this.
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+  \it Mussolini did the othering in terms of `other states' while Hitler did 
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+  it in terms of `other people'/`other nations' (like Jews etc).
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+\end{itemize}
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+
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+\section{Hitler}
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+\begin{itemize}
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+  \it Introduced to Anti-Semitism in his early 20s. Much of this influence 
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+  came from Martin Luther remarks about Jewish peoples.  
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+  \subitem He did not start out hating Jews, that came slowly.  
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+  \it He started out going to the Nazi party meetings as originally a police 
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+  spy, but liked what they were saying. 
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+  \it Unlike Mussolini, Hitler was democratically elected in, in a series of 
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+  elections (but only won by a vote of 37percent of votes).
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+  \it Post-WWI as post-war, and the economic issues of post-war.  
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+  \subitem anti-Semitism was already there, but Hitler just tapped into this 
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+  already existing sentiment. 
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+  \subitem what do you do with the soldiers who are coming home after the war?
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+  \it ``The construction of the other'': Giving a group of people the 
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+  qualities of the ``other'' so as to portray them as `not you' and able to do 
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+  horrible things to them.
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+  \subitem De-Humanise them, this is something Hitler did.  
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+  \it Like Mussolini, he created working programmes for the unemployed youth, 
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+  so as to indoctrinate the youth.  
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+  \it He also paid women to stay and home and have kids, for various reasons 
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+  such as freeing up labour force, indoctrination via the family etc. (note: 
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+  only women of the right `race').
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+  \subitem c.f: Eugenics. 
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+  \subitem Movie: Meeting of the Nazi leadership to decide the `final 
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+  solution', they DID NOT start out saying that we should just kill them. 
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+  \it The Eugenics Movement: Part of the construction of the other. 
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+  \subitem Eugenics Means \emph{Well Born}. Created as a part of Social Darwinism.   
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+  \subitem Both Positive (encouraging only certain people TO have children, 
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+  eg: Hitler giving money to certain women to have kids) and Negative Eugenics (Limiting certain groups from 
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+  having children).
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+  \subitem In Canada we had both, and Hitler used both as well. In Canada we 
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+  concentrated the eugenics programme on the mentally ill etc, but this 
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+  crossed into racism as well.  
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+  \subitem After WWII and where we saw the eugenics programme lead (ie: 
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+  Hitlers eugenics programme), most countries stopped the eugenics programme, 
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+  except for Canada which continued well into the 50s.  
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+  \it Hitler's eugenics programme, although concentrated on the Jewish 
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+  peoples, a lot of other peoples died as well, anyone who was NOT seen as the 
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+  Aryan.  
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+  \subitem The racism here, was important and was very necessary for the 
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+  `construction of the other'.
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+\end{itemize}
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+
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+\section{Fascism}
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+\begin{itemize}
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+  \it Against both CL and Marxism, as Fascism rejects notions of perpetual 
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+  peace, democracy, ideas of rational humans (part of CL), and ideas of 
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+  tolerance and equality were rejected in Fascism.   
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+  \it Rejected Marxism: There is no class war (part of the notion of national 
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+  solidarity), dictatorship of a LEADER and not the proletariat/intelligentia. 
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+  \it Unlike Marx, religion (although an issue in some ways to Hitler as well 
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+  as Mussolini) they used the mythology of religion to lead an irrational 
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+  peoples.  
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+  \it Nation-State: Nation and State are intertwined to Fascists.  
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+  \subitem Some Fascists will accept colonies others will not (Hitler would 
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+  not want everyone to become German but Mussolini would want everyone to 
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+  become Italian under him).
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+  \subitem Eugenics used to build the nation and control the population of the 
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+  state.  
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+  \it Racism: Hitler for instance created scientific research to justify and 
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+  solidify existing ideas of Racial and Gender separation. Racism exists, and 
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+  ideas of scientific racial differences etc, come about as a result of these 
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+  \it Autarky: Is it possible in a modern globalised era?
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+  \it Unlike Marx, fascists saw the complex relationships between Institutions 
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+  and Economy (Marx's ideas of Economic Determinism), and Fascism challenged 
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+  Marxists notions of the power of religion etc.  
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+  \it Does Fascism imply cruelty, at least any more than the interpretations 
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+  of other models?
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+  \it What happens if the leader dies in Fascism? Autarky as difficult to 
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+  sustain.  
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+\end{itemize}
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+
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+\end{document}
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+\documentclass[letterpaper,12pt,english]{article} %report for homework
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+
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+\usepackage{babel}
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+\usepackage{times}
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+\usepackage{pifont}
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+\usepackage{moreverb}
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+\usepackage{alltt}
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+\usepackage[pdfauthor={Tejas (Tj) Hariharan}]{hyperref}
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+
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+
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+\begin{document}
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+\renewcommand{\subitem}{\item[\ding{229}]}
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+\renewcommand{\it}{\item[\ding{225}]}
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+
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+\title{Lecture: \today }\author{Tejas (Tj) Hariharan 
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+\footnote{Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share 
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+Alike 3.0 License. c.f. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/ for full license}} 
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+\maketitle
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+
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+
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+\section{Tibetian Book of the Dead: Movie}
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+\begin{itemize}
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+  \it The consciousness remains between the 2 bardos for 49 days and the Book 
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+  of dead is read aloud to help the dead who can still hear.  		
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+  \it Mind separated from body suddenly and experiences its enlightenment as a 
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+  bright light.  
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+  \subitem Both life and death are a continuous stream of uncertain things, . In the bardo of 
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+  death if the mind doesn't realise itself, it is born again in the bardo of 
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+  life.  
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+  \it ``Perhaps if he takes the words of bardo to heart his next life would be 
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+  as a human''.
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+  \it Living Dying project: Helping dying people find meaning in death, as 
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+  death in our society was seen as a failure and there was a metaphor of fear 
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+  surrounding death, not so with the ideas of Bardo that are found in Tibetan 
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+  Buddhism.
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+  \subitem This project helps terminally ill patients by helping them explore 
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+  other metaphors of life/death that would help them.  
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+  \it Bardo totem as a guidebook to help go through the journey of death 
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+  (death as not an end but a journey, a stage etc).
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+  \it Poa: a unique Ceremony in Tibetan Buddhism to help the consciousness leave 
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+  the body the right way (via the top of the head) during death, so they can 
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+  enter the pure realm of life after death, rather than linger in the 
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+  uncertainties of the Bardo. 
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+  \it If the consciousness has left from the head then it's a good sign, as the 
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+  consciousness has had no obstructions as it left the body (remember: the 
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+  heart of conciousness is the HEART not head in Tibetan Buddhism).
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+  \it ``I haven't done anything bad, so I'm not afraid to die'', the old man 
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+  who has done everything as he should and is ready to die, and wishes it to 
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+  come to him quickly. (Death as seen as something that always happens, and if 
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+  you are good then your death can result in liberation). If one has lived per 
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+  the Buddha's teachings, he is not afraid of dying. 
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+  \it After 9 days, if the dead fails to recognise the peaceful dieties in the 
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+  realm of the death (Bardo) as merely projections of his own mind, they turn 
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+  into horrible demons, terrifying demons. 
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+  \subitem ``Do not be afraid of these demons for they are projections of your 
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+  own mind, if you do recognise this liberation from the Bardo will occur as 
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+  simultaneous with the recognition''
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+  \it So that the dead may not cling to his body and those he left behind may 
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+  release him from their attachment to him, the body is offered to the fire (cremation).
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+  \subitem The substances that are offered with the body represent everything 
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+  that re desirable and sustaining in this world.   
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+  \subitem Possessions donated to the monastery, to complete this process of 
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+  `letting go' and later auctioned to the village. 
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+  \it If the dead still does not recognise his state etc, by the last days, he 
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+  will once again experience the pain of death. The Bardo Thotrol is read aloud 
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+  to help the dead find a new rebirth as human, to help in this process.  
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+\end{itemize}
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+\end{document}